PI5 Custom Shape Gallery Kimono


As someone who loves to sew, I've always admired the vibrant colors and patterns,  silken texture and sheer craftmanship of Japanese kimonos. I've seen beautiful antique kimonos hung on museum and restaurant walls and thought "I wish I could make something like that."

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If you like these rich fabrics too, why not take advantage of some of PhotoImpact 5.0's wonderful new shapes to create your own colorful, digital kimono?

This tutorial shows you how to use these simple shapes to make a kimono-clad geisha. In fact, you can use shapes to make almost anything. Like a coloring book, once the objects for the kimono, geisha and fan have been made, add your favorite colors, textures, bump maps, shading and light effects. Slip a garden photo into the background, then turn it into a one of a kind painting.

This tutorial is not difficult, but it has a lot of steps. First we'll make the objects for the kimono, then the geisha's head, hands and feet, and then her fan. If you have difficulty making the objects or just want to save time you can download the UFO kimono ZIP file (70 kb).

So that I don't have to repeat myself, all of the objects will be 3D Round path objects with all Material effects removed, resulting in pale, dull gray objects. Don't worry, things will be a lot more exciting later on! In addition, even though the parts of the kimono are 3D Round, the kimono objects' beveled borders will all be reduced to 2 pixels. Doing so flattens them down like cloth, but since they remain 3D objects, you'll still be able to add texture, shading, bumps, reflections and all the other goodies you love from the Material dialog box.

Make a new image 400 X 400 pixels.

Select the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, choose the Rectangle shape. From the Mode dropdown list, select 3D Round. Draw a tall rectangle like the one shown below. Open the EasyPalette's Material Gallery and choose Plastic. Double click on the Remove Material thumbnail to remove all previously applied effects.

tall rectangle object

Click on the Transform tool. From the Freely transform options in the Attributes toolbar, select Perspective (arrow). Drag a top control point slightly in toward the center, making the rectangle somewhat more narrow at the top. This is the shorter, wide piece in the center of the kimono.

transform rectangle shape

Switch back to the Path Drawing Tool. Since cloth isn't really puffy and 3 dimensional, we need to flatten this object out. You could drag the border slider down in the Attributes toolbar, but for very small borders, it's easier to use the Material box.

Click on the Material box button in the Attributes toolbar. When the dialog box opens, click on the Border/Depth tab and enter a value of 2 for Border. All of the objects making up the kimono should be similarly edited.

bring border down to 2 pixels

Use the Path Drawing Tool to draw another tall rectangle that is a bit longer than the first one. Shown below is the new rectangle, compared to the first one you made. Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels.

making 2nd object for kimono

Copy the new rectangle into the Clipboard by hitting Ctrl+C or clicking on the Copy button. Paste it back into the image by hitting Ctrl+V or clicking on the Paste button.

Select the Transform tool. In the Attributes toolbar, choose the Resize option. Leave the height exactly as it is, but drag one of the middle control handles toward the center to make a tall, narrow rectangle like this one.

resize object

Click on the Pick tool. Position the first three kimono objects as shown here (I've made the grays darker so you can see the separate objects better). Stack the first one on the bottom, the second one in the middle, and the third, narrow rectangle on top.

arrange first 3 kimono objects

If necessary use the Order options in the Attributes toolbar to change the stacking order of the objects.

Now we'll make the next object, the first part of the sleeve. Select the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, select Custom Shape to open the Custom Shape box. Select Shape 1.

new shape

Draw an object with the new shape. It will be horizontal within the image. Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels.

draw first sleeve object

Choose Edit, Rotate & Flip, Flip Vertically. Then choose Edit, Rotate & Flip, Rotate Right 90 degrees, so the object is vertical. Copy the object into the Clipboard and paste it back into the image. While the pasted copy is active, select Edit, Rotate & Flip, Flip Horizontally. Use the selection tool to position the sleeve objects on each side of the other objects making up the kimono.

adding sleeve objectsChoose the Transform tool. Click on the right sleeve object to make it active. In the Attributes toolbar, rotate the object 2 degrees clockwise.

Click on the left sleeve object to make it active. In the Attributes toolbar, rotate it 2 degrees counterclockwise.

Click on the Pick tool. Position the sleeves even with the tops of the other objects. Use the Order options to Send to Back both of the sleeve objects.

Select the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, choose the Rectangle shape.

Draw a tall, narrow rectangle the size shown at left. Make it just a bit longer than the curved sleeve object you made earlier. This is the middle sleeve object.

Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels.

middle part of sleeve

Copy the new object into the Clipboard and paste it back into the Image. Use the selection tool to position the middle sleeve objects on the sides of the other kimono objects. The tops of the objects should all be aligned. Click on the Pick tool. Use the Attributes toolbar's Order options, if necessary, to Send to Top the middle sleeve objects.

Choose the Path drawing tool again. The Rectangle shape should still be selected. Draw a short, narrow rectangle for the cuff of the sleeve. Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels.

Copy the cuff object into the Clipboard and paste it back into the image. Use the selection tool to position the cuff objects on the sides of the other kimono objects. The tops of the objects should all be aligned. Click on the Pick tool. Use the Attributes toolbar's Order options, if necessary, to Send to Top the cuff objects.

making cuff objects

Return to the Path Drawing Tool. The Rectangle shape should still be selected. Draw a wide rectangle, as shown below, for the kimono collar. Use the selection tool to position it in the center of the three overlapping objects making up the main body of the kimono. Click on the Pick tool. Use the Attributes toolbar's Order options, if necessary, to Send to Bottom the collar object.

kimono objects assembled

Next let's make the geisha's head. Select the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, select the Ellipse shape. Draw a slightly wider-than-tall round shape like this one.

back of head

Click on the Transform tool. In the Attributes toolbar, select the Perspective option. Drag on a lower control point to make the bottom slightly narrower than the top. If necessary, widen the top until you get a shape like this one. In the Attributes toolbar, drag the Border slider slightly to the left to flatten out just the "peak" in the middle of this 3D shape.

transform shape of head

Select the Path Drawing Tool. The Ellipse shape should still be chosen. Draw a flattened oval for the topknot. Use the selection tool to position the topknot in the center at the top of the head. Return to the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, select the Rounded Rectangle shape. Draw a very narrow vertical "stick" about an inch tall for the topknot. Copy the stick object into the Clipboard and paste it back into the image. Use the selection tool to position a stick on each side of the topknot. While the stick on the right side is active, select the Transform tool. In the Attributes toolbar, rotate the stick 45 degrees clockwise. Click on the left stick and rotate it 45 degrees counterclockwise.

Select the Pick tool. Use the Order options in the Attributes toolbar to arrange the head, topknot and sticks as shown below.

position head, topknot and sticks

Return to the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, choose the Rectangle shape. Draw a small, wide rectangle for the foot. Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels. Copy the foot object into the Clipboard and paste it back into the image. Use the selection tool to position the feet in the center, at the lower edge of the kimono.

Select the Pick tool. Use the Order options in the Attributes toolbar to Send to Back the feet objects. They should be positioned as shown at left.

add feet

Next we'll make the geisha's hands. Choose the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, click on Custom Shape. When the Custom Shape box opens, select Arch 2. Draw a small shape like this one for the hand.

hand object

Click on the Transform tool. In the Attributes toolbar, select the Resize option. Drag a center control point to the center to narrow the object slightly.

narrow object slightly

In the Attributes toolbar, rotate the hand object 55 degrees clockwise. Copy the hand into the Clipboard and paste it back into the image. Choose Edit, Rotate & Flip, Flip Horizontally. Use the Pick tool to position the hand objects at the end of the sleeves, at the top edges of the cuffs. Use the Order options in the Attributes toolbar to Send to Bottom the hand objects (see below).

hands added

Next we'll make the obi or sash for the kimono. Select the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar, select the Rectangle shape. Draw a rectangle like the one shown at left. It should span all 3 parts of the main body of the kimono at the waist. Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels.

kimono sash object

To make a bow to place on top of the obi, select Custom Shape. When the Custom Shape box opens, select Shape 5. Draw a bow shape the same width as the obi. Use the Material box Border/Depth tab to take the border down to 2 pixels. The bow will be a bit too tall compared to the obi. Select the Transform tool. In the Attributes toolbar, choose the Resize option. Leave the width of the bow as is, but drag on the top middle control point so that it is no taller than the obi.

Use the selection tool to position obi and bow over the center of the kimono body at the waist, as shown above.

Now it's time to group all of the objects making up the geisha. Open the EasyPalette's Layer Manager. Click on the first thumbnail on the left in the top row.

Hold down on the Shift key while clicking on the remaining thumbnails in the Layer Manager. Doing so selects all of the objects at the same time. Right click anywhere in the Layer Manager and choose Group. Grouping "hooks" objects together so they move as a unit.

Notice that you did not choose "Combine as Single Object." Never choose to Combine objects until you are completely through editing them. Once objects are Combined they are permanently linked together and the individual objects can no longer be edited.

Click in the base image to deactivate the Grouped objects. The last thing we need to make is the geisha's fan. Select the Path Drawing Tool. In the Attributes toolbar choose Custom Shape. When the Custom Shape box opens, select Arrow 3. Draw an arrow shape about 1-1/2 inches wide. The arrow shape is wide enough for the fan, but a bit too tall for our purposes. Click on the Transform tool.

In the Attributes toolbar, select the Resize option. Drag downward slightly on the middle top control point until it looks like the arrow shown below.

fan base

In the Attributes toolbar, rotate the arrow 40 degrees clockwise. This will serve as the first of 9 identical objects making up the fan. Copy the object to the Clipboard and paste it back into the image. Rotate the pasted copy 10 degrees clockwise. Position it so that its long left edge slightly overlaps the long right edge of the previously created object. The little pointy ends should come together. Copy the pasted object and paste it back into the image, rotate the new object 10 degrees clockwise, and position its long left side along the right side of the previously created object. Repeat these steps 6 more times, always copying the most recently pasted object, until you have 9 objects aligned in a fan shape.

Just as you did to Group the kimono and geisha objects, open the EasyPalette's Layer Manager. Click on the first thumbnail on the left in the top row. Hold down on the Shift key while clicking on the remaining thumbnails in the Layer Manager. Doing so selects all of the objects at the same time. Right click anywhere in the Layer Manager and choose Group. Grouping "hooks" objects together so they move as a unit.

Use the selection tool to position the fan in the geisha's left hand. In the Layer Manager you should see 2 thumbnails: the geisha and the fan. Click on the fan thumbnail and Shift-click on the geisha thumbnail. Right click anywhere in the Layer Manager and choose Group. Now all of the objects in the image are Grouped together. They should all move around as one unit when dragged.

place fan in left hand

This would be a very good time to save the entire group of objects. Either choose File, Save As and save in the UFO file type. Alternatively, drag the grouped objects to the EasyPalette, and when the Add to EasyPalette box opens, save the objects to a Gallery and Tab group. Once you've saved the objects, you can open them any time you want to edit them.

Position the grouped objects in the center of the base image. If you need more space around the objects, choose Edit, Expand and expand by 20-30 pixels around. Select the Path Drawing Tool.

Now we've finally come to the really fun part -- coloring! Before we can add color and texture to the objects, they need to be separated. Right click and choose Ungroup. That will separate the fan from the geisha and her kimono. Now right click on the geisha and choose Ungroup. Click anywhere in the base image to deactivate the objects.

Without moving it, click on the long, narrow rectangle in the center of the kimono body, the one labeled "3" at the top of the tutorial. You should see an animated broken line around only that object, indicating that it is the active object in the image. We'll start with this one. Click on the Material button in the Attributes toolbar to open the Material dialog box.

Click on the Color/Texture tab and select Texture. Click in the color box and select Magic Texture. Choose a texture you like. I decided to use reds, oranges and yellows predominantly for my kimono, but you can choose textures with colors you like best. 

After you select a texture, click on the More button. Doing so opens the Magic Texture box, from which you can edit the texture. Each time you select a thumbnail it moves to the center and the others are redrawn. Keep clicking until you get a texture you like, then click OK.

editing texture from color/texture tab

You can add surface texture to the object from the Bump tab. Here I've added one of my own textures from the Bump tab, at 100% Density.

add bump map

Metallic shading isn't just for solid colors. You can create some interesting effects from the Shading tab by selecting a Metallic option. I added Copper shading to the texture and bump map.

edit Shading

To brighten up the surface of the texture, I added another Direct light from the Light tab.

add light from Light tab

If you like the look of the preset you've made, before clicking OK to apply it, click on the Add button in the Material dialog box. Doing so opens the Add to EasyPalette box, where you can name the preset and save it to a Gallery and Tab group.

Here's the finished texture for the first object in the kimono.

Continue to edit color, texture, bump, light, shading and reflection for each object in the kimono. Click on the next object to select it, then click on the Material button to open the Material dialog box again. Make choices from the tabs and click OK to apply.

I applied one of my own textured yellow-gold presets to all of the objects making up the fan. However, it looked too yellow to me, so I changed its look entirely by choosing Format, Style, and from the Light tab I selected Argon. The filter turned the yellow-gold fan to a lovely metallic red that went well with the kimono colors.

For the geisha's head, topknot and shoes I used black. I used a pink-beige color (RGB=180, 180, 180) for her hands. The little sticks in her topknot are gold.

If you want to add a Shadow to the geisha, use the Layer Manager to select all of the objects, then right click and Combine as Single Object. Now you can choose Object, Shadow (or right click, Shadow) to add a drop or perspective shadow. You could just right click and Merge All if you are satisfied with your geisha as she is.

However, if you want to get a little fancier, don't merge the objects with the base image. Instead, choose Selection, Select Base Image and fill the background with a landscape or other appropriate scene.

I've used a landscape with peacocks from the PI 5.0 CD, Samples/ Images/ Animals folder, #06471021. I used the Clone Paint Brush tool to clone out tree branches in the middle of the image, so it wouldn't look like they were growing out of the geisha's head.

Open up the photo in the work space, copy it to the Clipboard, then paste it into the image. You won't be able to see your geisha, but don't worry. Click on the Pick tool and use the Send to Bottom Order option in the Attributes toolbar to put the scenery behind the geisha into the background. Now right click and Merge All. I've also added an Edge Frame.

Or take it one step further -- after merging with the base image, choose Effect, Creative, Painting and select one of the preset painting effects. Here I've used Template 23 with all of its default parameters, except I changed the Fineness to 100.

half size, scenery and painting effect

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